Dizziness, Balance Issues and Treatment

Our physicians and audiologists are uniquely qualified to diagnose and treat dizziness and balance disorders. We offer the most advanced diagnostic testing and treatment options available. The physician will obtain a detailed medical history and perform a physical examination to start to sort out possible causes of the balance disorder and may require tests to assess the cause and extent of the disruption of balance.

Dizziness & Balance Issues

When balance is impaired, an individual has difficulty maintaining orientation. For example, an individual may experience the “room spinning” and may not be able to walk without staggering, or may not even be able to arise. Some of the symptoms a person with a balance disorder may experience are:

  • A sensation of dizziness or vertigo (spinning)
  • Falling or a feeling of falling
  • Lightheadedness or feeling woozy
  • Visual blurring
  • Disorientation

Our physicians and audiologists are uniquely qualified to diagnose and treat hearing loss, dizziness and balance disorders. We offer the most advanced diagnostic testing and treatment options available.

  • You may hear but not understand people
  • You may have difficulty understanding radio, television or public address systems
  • You need to watch a person’s lips in order to understand
  • You find yourself asking people to repeat what they have said
  • You may pretend to understand
  • You may avoid people and isolate yourself
  • You may find it emotionally and physically exhausting to communicate
  • It appears that you are the only one who has these difficulties

Hearing loss can be categorized by where or what part of the auditory system is damaged. There are three basic types of hearing loss

  • conductive hearing loss
  • sensorineural hearing loss and
  • mixed hearing loss

Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is not conducted efficiently through the outer ear canal to the eardrum and the tiny bones, or ossicles, of the middle ear. Conductive hearing loss usually involves a reduction in sound level, or the ability to hear faint sounds. This type of hearing loss can often be medically or surgically corrected.

Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when there is damage to the inner ear (cochlea) or to the nerve pathways from the inner ear (retrocochlear) to the brain. Sensorineural hearing loss cannot be medically or surgically corrected. It is a permanent loss.

Sometimes a conductive hearing loss occurs in combination with a sensorineural hearing loss. In other words, there may be damage in the outer or middle ear and in the inner ear (cochlea) or auditory nerve. When this occurs, the hearing loss is referred to as a mixed hearing loss.

The configuration or shape of the hearing loss refers to the extent of hearing loss at each frequency and the overall picture of hearing that is created. For example, a hearing loss that only affects the high frequencies would be described as a high-frequency loss.

Millions of Americans have disorders of balance they describe as dizziness. A balance disorder is a disturbance that causes an individual to feel unsteady, giddy, woozy, or have a sensation of movement, spinning or floating.

When balance is impaired, an individual has difficulty maintaining orientation. For example, an individual may experience the “room spinning” and may not be able to walk without staggering, or may not even be able to arise. Some of the symptoms a person with a balance disorder may experience are:

Infections (viral or bacterial), head injury, disorders of blood circulation affecting the inner ear or brain, certain medications and aging may change our balance system and result in a balance problem.

Infections (viral or bacterial), head injury, disorders of blood circulation affecting the inner ear or brain, certain medications and aging may change our balance system and result in a balance problem.

Some of the more common balance disorders are:

Diagnosis of a balance disorder is complicated because there are many kinds of balance disorders and because other medical conditions--including ear infections, blood pressure changes, and some vision problems – and some medications may contribute to a balance disorder.

There are various options for treating balance disorders. One option includes treatment for a disease or disorder that may be contributing to the balance problem, such as ear infection, stroke, or multiple sclerosis. Individual treatment will vary and will be based upon symptoms, medical history, general health, examination by a physician, and the results of medical tests.